an Oh Myyy Property
popular

An Episode Of 'Star Trek' From The '80s Accurately Predicted What Happens To Our Brains When We Die

Star Trek TNG Skin of Evil Part 2/YouTube

An episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation accurately predicted what happens to our brains when we die, fans say, after a recent study revealed that the brain continues to function for 20-40 seconds after the heart stops.


Published in the Annals of Neurology, the study states that brain activity doesn't immediately cease at the moment of death. Rather, it slowly goes into "cerebral ischemia" as it is gradually deprived of oxygen. This "sleep mode" was depicted in an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation that aired in 1988.

In the episode entitled Skin of Evil Part 2, crew member Tasha Yar is badly injured by an alien entity named Armus when she challenges its power. Armus was preventing the crew from rescuing fellow crew mates from a stranded shuttle on a remote planet.

When Yar's body was transported back aboard the Enterprise, Dr. Beverly Crusher says that even though there is no brain activity, Yar may be able to be revived. "Neurons are beginning to depolarize," a crew member says, and this is exactly what was demonstrated in the aforementioned study. At the time of death, neurons release their stored energy in a "brain tsunami," after which oxygen deprivation prevents resuccitation.

"Spreading depolarization marks the onset of the toxic cellular changes that eventually lead to death, but is not a marker of death per se, since depolarization is reversible – up to a point – with restoration of energy supply," lead author Professor Jens Dreier, of Charité's Center for Stroke Research, told IFLScience.





Cecilie_Arcurs/Getty Images; @divyara85751279/Twitter

The third Sunday of June is Father's Day in 87 different countries around the world.

All told, 111 countries celebrate fathers at some time during the year.

Keep reading... Show less
British Airways/PA

British Airways celebrated Father's Day by giving some of its fathers the chance to work alongside their sons and daughters on a long-haul flight.

Keep reading... Show less
Stefan Rousseau/PA Images

Google appears to have resolved an unfortunate gaffe with its online translation service which incorrectly translated:

“I am sad to see Hong Kong become part of China"

...as...

“I am happy to see Hong Kong become part of China".
Keep reading... Show less
Stefan Rousseau/PA Images

Google appears to have resolved an unfortunate gaffe with its online translation service which incorrectly translated:

“I am sad to see Hong Kong become part of China"

...as...

“I am happy to see Hong Kong become part of China".
Keep reading... Show less
Tim and his family (PA Real Life)

Tim Bilton was at the height of his career, planning to open his second restaurant and appearing on shows including the BBC's Great British Menu, when he was first diagnosed with melanoma, a type of skin cancer, in his eye in March 2013.

The award-winning TV chef was on the cusp of receiving a Michelin star when cancer treatment cruelly robbed him of his sense of taste, has revealed the devastating news that the disease has returned – giving him just 12 months to live.

Keep reading... Show less
@CommanderRex7/Twitter, @percvbeths/Twitter

With the highly-anticipated release of Spider-Man: Far From Home less than a month away, the internet is getting pumped.

But the promotional material released by Marvel Studios thus far has left fans...well...less than thrilled.

Keep reading... Show less