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Trump Roasted Hard After His Prophesied 'Reinstatement' Date Comes And Goes Without A Peep

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump is getting roasted hard after his prophesied "reinstatement" date came and went.

Last month, MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, one of Trump's most devoted followers, insisted that Trump would be reinstated to the White House on August 13.

Lindell had claimed, without providing any evidence, that this reinstatement would coincide with his release of definitive proof that the 2020 general election was stolen.

There was none.

But that didn't happen. "Reinstatement Day" proved to be another fantasy from hardcore QAnon followers eager for Trump's return to prominence.

Trump was resoundingly criticized online as a result.

Consider the following statement from veteran journalist and national evening news anchor Dan Rather.

Former Secretary of Labor Robert Reich, now an oft-cited social media commentator on all things Trump, had a more sobering response.

He reminded his readers that Trump "could be barred from holding office again" for inciting the January 6 insurrection against Congress.

A TikTok influencer even mocked Trump by miming Trump's gait and creating a "dance" to commemorate the so-called "reinstatement."

Other responses were less eloquent... but no less effective.







The belief Trump would be reinstated by August had circulated for some time.

In June, New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman revealed Trump had reportedly been telling people he expected he would be "reinstated" to the White House by August. There is no constitutional basis for such a claim.

At the time, Haberman did note Trump's claim was being floated as he faced the "possibility of an indictment" from the Manhattan District Attorney.

Later that same month, Trump Organization Chief Financial Officer Allen Weisselberg would be charged with a slew of financial crimes.

A June Morning Consult poll found 29% of Republicans believe Trump will be reinstated to the White House.

The majority of Republicans—61%—dismissed the idea, though 59% of Republicans said they would like to see Trump take a larger role in the party moving forward.