an Oh Myyy Property

The two siblings that form the circus act "The Flying Wallendas" crossed New York's Times Square on a high wire strung between two skyscrapers 25 stories above the street.


Nik Wallenda is a seventh-generation acrobat, but he still felt nervous when performing. Particularly since his sister, Lijana Wallenda, joined him on Sunday night for the first time since her near-fatal accident in 2017, when she broke nearly every bone in her face.

The siblings walked from opposite ends of the 1,300-foot wire suspended between the towers, crossing each other in the middle, where Lijana sat on the wire and let her brother step over her. Both then continued to the opposite side.

Their latest daredevil stunt was streamed live on ABC and watched by thousands of spectators from below.

Nik Wallenda was joined by his sister Lijana for the daring stuntAP/Press Association Images - Jason Szenes

The two were wearing tethered safety harnesses required by the city in case they fell. The Wallenda family has been a star tightrope-walking troupe for generations, tracing their roots to 1780 in Austria-Hungary, when their ancestors travelled as a band of acrobats, aerialists, jugglers, animal trainers, and trapeze artists.

They never use nets in live shows or rehearsals.

The high wire was suspended 25 storeys above the pavement AP/Press Association Images - Jason Szenes

Lijana's fall happened during an attempt to break a Guinness world record with an eight-person pyramid. But she's not the only one that has fallen. In 1962, Karl Wallenda's nephew and son-in-law died, and his son was paralyzed, after a seven-person pyramid collapsed during a performance. And, in 1978, 73-year-old Karl Wallenda fell to his death from a high wire strung between two buildings in Puerto Rico.

Nik's high-wire walks above Niagara Falls, the Chicago skyline, and the Little Colorado River Gorge near Grand Canyon National Park were broadcast on national television.

Thankfully, this was a successful performance. You can watch the full video here.

There's a certain kind of person people expect to vote for Donald Trump, whether they're real or not.

On July 21, Twitter user @malkatz asked internet users to do a fascinating thought experiment:

which fictional characters seem like they "absolutely voted for Trump."

Keep reading... Show less

Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images for NYCWFF, Marie Cleone/Facebook

A black couple is citing racial profiling when the boyfriend was proposing to his girlfriend at a hard cider company in Walden, New York.

On Sunday, security staff from Apple Orchard Farm was alerted to the theft of a T-shirt from its gift shop.

But the attempt to recover the allegedly stolen item quickly escalated into what may as well have been a drug bust.

Keep reading... Show less

If you're a hardcore Trump-supporter, there's no better place to have your wedding than one of his golf clubs.

A New Jersey couple having a MAGA-themed wedding (yes, really) at Trump's Bedminster resort even went so far as to tuck Trump 2020 flags into the brides dress.

Keep reading... Show less
Iiris since ditching shampoo (PA Real Life/Collect)

A student who has not used shampoo or conditioner in almost two years has told how her itchy scalp has been cured and her locks look healthier than ever.

Keep reading... Show less

We carry all sorts of things we might need with us on a regular basis: our cell phones, wallets, a couple of adhesive bandages, that loose change that always seems to be in the bottom of your pocket unless you actually need it. Some people though, have taken this to the extreme.

Keep reading... Show less
Dude Perfect/YouTube / @JersyStrong11/Twitter

The newly resurfaced 2016 video from YouTubers Dude Perfect showcases Serena Williams' phenomenal accuracy and talent, and shows why no amateur has a hope of scoring a point on her.

Even if they're one in eight random men on the internet.

Keep reading... Show less