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Oklahoma Mayor Revises Mask Mandate After Employees in Re-Opened Businesses Receive Threats

Oklahoma Mayor Revises Mask Mandate After Employees in Re-Opened Businesses Receive Threats
Mayor Will Joyce/Facebook

Local, state and federal governments around the country are struggling with how best to protect their citizens while balancing public health with economic needs of businesses.

For many areas, businesses are reopening gradually with employees and patrons asked to wear face masks to mitigate the spread of the viral pathogen at the root of the global pandemic.


Apparently that was a bridge too far for some of the residents of Stillwater, Oklahoma.

Just hours after Mayor Will Joyce announced businesses would reopen and the business owners could ask patrons to wear masks, employees began to report receiving abuse, threats and harassment. The city received the same kind of public feedback.

City Manager Norman McNickle—a hired employee—said in a statement:

"In the short time beginning on May 1, 2020, that face coverings have been required for entry into stores/restaurants, store employees have been threatened with physical violence and showered with verbal abuse."
"In addition, there has been one threat of violence using a firearm. This has occurred in three short hours and in the face of clear medical evidence that face coverings helps contain the spread of COVID-19."

Mayor Joyce—an elected official—addressed the issue on Twitter.




Joyce then addressed the issue of face coverings...



...including addressing the bullies.



Joyce stressed the importance of finding common ground.

Two months prior, Mayor Joyce shared how he shaved his beard in solidarity with the city's first responders.

Police, fire and rescue workers were asked to shave their facial hair so they masks would fit properly.

After the mask requirement was rolled back, Joyce shared some of the threats the city received.

While those against the mask requirement threatened the city, business owners and employees, those in favor of masks called for the city to use force against protestors.

The city's official statement cleared up some of the protestors misconceptions about their rights.

"Many of those with objections cite the mistaken belief the requirement is unconstitutional, and under their theory, one cannot be forced to wear a mask. No law or court supports this view. In fact, a recent Federal lawsuit against Guthrie's face covering order was fully dismissed by the United States District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma."
"It is further distressing that these people, while exercising their believed rights, put others at risk. As mentioned, there is clear medical evidence the face coverings prevent COVID-19 spread; they are recommended by both the CDC and the Oklahoma State Department of Health. The wearing of face coverings is little inconvenience to protect both the wearer and anyone with whom they have contact. And, an unprotected person who contracts the virus can infect their own loved ones and others."

They pointed out that private businesses also have rights regarding their personal safety and the safety of their employees.

"It is further well settled that a business is private property to which people do not have unfettered right of entry. Just as a business has the right to enforce 'No Shoes, No Shirt, No Service,' the business can require a face covering as a condition to entry."

Those who opposed the face covering requirement were characterized as self-absorbed.

"The City of Stillwater has attempted to keep people safe by the simple requirement to wear a face covering to protect others. It is unfortunate and distressing that those who refuse and threaten violence are so self-absorbed as to not follow what is a simple show of respect and kindness to others."
"In that effort to insure the safety of others, we now have to weigh the safety of store owners and employees to threats of violence. We cannot, in clear conscience, put our local business community in harm's way, nor can the police be everywhere. Accordingly, we will now be asking our local stores and business to encourage, but not require, patrons to cover their faces. Of course, each business can choose to adopt a more stringent approach, and we ask everyone to respect and abide by such decisions."

They concluded by stating once again the point of face masks.

"Wearing a face covering is an easy way to support the health of your community and speed our recovery from this pandemic. Please do so."

The book Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond is available here.

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