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Trump Supporter Accused Of Falsifying Details Of Antifa 'Attack' To Crowdfund Her Moving Expenses

@CassandraRules / Twitter

A far-right writer and activist has been accused of exaggerating or possibly even fabricating a story to get her followers to pay for her moving costs.

The whole story was reported by the website "Right Wing Watch" (RWW), a project of the non-profit People for the American Way.

Jared Holt, the investigative journalist who wrote the story, summed it up in a tweet.

Cassandra Fairbanks is a right wing figure and contributor to The Gateway Pundit. A self-proclaimed "former liberal libertarian," she further claims to have embraced support of Trump and far-right ideology only in recent years.

On June 1, Fairbanks made a call to the 911 emergency line, telling the person on the other end that someone was attacking her home with guns and fireworks. She pointed out that someone doxxed her online, leaking her home address at the time.

Fairbanks shared a copy of her 911 call on Twitter.

Fairbanks says she sounds ridiculous because she doesn't want to wake her daughter who apparently slept through the gunshots and fireworks that prompted her to call 911.

After this, with her permission, the right-wing outlet Rebel Media started a GoFundMe page to raise money to relocate Fairbanks to another state.

In all, they raised just over $24,000 for the move.




However, the Right Wing Watch article questions the events of the 911 call.

Fairbanks said she was receiving death threats online after criticizing the ongoing protests and riots. Additionally, she claimed people had shown up to her house and tried to attack her.

The attackers banged on her windows, set off fireworks, fired off guns and threatened her life. However, RWW couldn't find any evidence of this kind of threat.

The District of Columbia police who arrived at the scene only found used fireworks packaging more than 100 feet from Fairbank's home. The city's gunshot detection system did not report any gunfire in the area.

And interviews with Fairbanks' neighbors found none of them could corroborate the story Fairbanks told. When asked if there was more evidence to the story, Fairbanks declined to provide it to RWW.

On top of the money made by Fairbanks for an attack no one else saw or heard and police cannot verify took place, many right wing websites ran Fairbanks' version of events as proof that "Antifa" was violently attacking people.




After Fairbanks' story went live, Rebel Media started their fundraiser. They raised $24,300 to move Fairbanks to a "red, red state".

Despite the fundraiser and her story being shared as proof of violent retribution by Antifa activists, the D.C. police report shows only mention of possible fireworks in the area, and none of the eight neighbors RWW interviewed shared Fairbanks' version of events.

Others online shared their own stories about living in D.C. and how ridiculous you'd be if you thought fireworks were gunshots.



Fairbanks did share messages on her Twitter showing the death threats she was receiving.

Some stated they knew where she lived and would be there "soon". However, the one closest to the time of events was sent seven hours before.

RWW claims this is all part—or at least taking advantage of—right wing media's need to vilify Antifa activists.

It is being painted as the new boogey man by outlets like Fox News and Breitbart.