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Southern Woman Cracks Herself Up With All The Insults She's Learned Since Moving To The UK

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

An American living in England couldn't hide her amusement at some of their more unusual native insults, so she decided to share them on TikTok.

And her joy at England's unusual smack-down terminology has now been seen by over 1.7 million viewers.

@yorkshirepeach, a self described "Georgia Peach living In Yorkshire", has been taking to the social media app to share the many cultural differences she's discovered since expatriating.

And a video in which she shared her discovery of a number of British pejoratives she was previously unaware of proved particularly popular.

@yorkshirepeach

#americanintheuk

Titled "American in the UK: British insults I'd never heard until I moved here", @yorkshirepeach began her list with one of the Brit's most popular insults to throw, "wanker."

A term for an unpleasant or disagreeable person, wanker literally means someone who masturbates.

@yorkshirepeach immediately laughed at the very sound of the word in her quintessential southern drawl, admitting it sounded far less potent than when spoken with a clipped British accent.

"I can't get away with saying it, can I?

After saying it once again with her hard American "R" at the end, she then repeated the word in a faux British accent—sans "R"—wondering if it was more effective that way.

An insult @yorkshirepeach found even more amusing, however was "bellend" which she admitted to being initially baffled by.

"Why did it take me literally like three years to realize what it even meant?"

Indeed, many other Americans watching the video were also likely confused by this one, which is a slang term for the head of a penis.

"I never heard that before I moved here. It's funny when you think about it, innit?"
"I just never thought about what it actually means."

Even while @yorkshirepeach might still be getting used to the insults, she proved to have adapted to some British speech patterns, notably her use of "innit" as opposed to "isn't it."

Though the British insult @yorkshirepeach seemed to appreciate far above the rest, was referring to another person as a "wet lettuce," usually thrown at someone believed to have weak character.

"Maybe it's just me, but I never heard that before I moved here."
"But it's so perfect, I mean think of it, have you ever thought it through?"
"How bad is wet lettuce, has anyone ever served you a salad and it's a bit soggy?"
"There's nothing worse than a soggy salad, is there?"

People filled @yorkshirepeach's comment section with even more unusual British put-downs.

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

However, many claimed just about anything can be used as an insult in England, even some of the most seemingly friendly words.

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

The newfound information just about any word could be used in a derogatory fashion in England prompted @yorkshirepeach to post a follow-up video.

@yorkshirepeach

#americanintheuk

Titled "American in the UK: Wait so anything can be an insult here?," @yorkshirepeach addressed one of the comments which suggested any word could be used as an insult as long as it was preceded by "absolute."

She then invited others to share their favorite, unusual insults and people were quick to oblige.

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok


@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

@yorkshirepeach/TikTok

@yorkshirepeach ended the video by adding one of her own.

"You absolute... milk carton."

@yorkshirepeach quickly laughed it off, admitting it was a less than effective insult.

But as her follow up video has since secured over 71 thousand likes, she may very well hear someone screaming "you absolute milk carton" to the telly when watching football next time she frequents her local pub.