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Kellogg's Bombarded With Fake Applications As They Try To Permanently Replace Striking Workers

Rey Del Rio/Getty Images

After officially going on strike on October 5, 2021, about 1,400 workers at Kellogg's cereal plants rejected a new proposed contract from the company this past Tuesday.

The cereal company responded their offer was fair and should have brought an end to the strike.

"We have made every effort to reach a fair agreement, including making six offers to the union throughout negotiations, all which have included wage and benefits increases for every employee."
"It appears the union created unrealistic expectations for our employees"

The most recent, renegotiated contract included wage increases and the potential for transitional employees with four or more years of experience to be promoted to legacy positions.

But the striking union members disagreed with how the new offer removed the maximum number of lower-tier employees and how transitional employees would receive far worse pay and benefits.

As a result of the ongoing strike, there has been a high-profile boycott of Kellogg's products throughout the country, with the union getting support from former Democratic presidential candidates Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

A video was also posted to Twitter following the failed negotiation.

Striking workers exposed their current working conditions and what needs to change.

But the cereal empire didn't seem terribly concerned by the fallout.

Not only have they made it clear they have no intention of returning to negotiations with the union any time soon, but they have even taken to finding permanent, non-union replacements for their 1,400 striking employees.

As a result, a Reddit post in the "antiwork" subReddit urged Redditors to bombard Kellogg's with fake applications.

BloominFunions/Reddit

After being upvoted more than 45 thousand times, the post subsequently went viral on Twitter.


The Reddit post highlights Kellogg's plan to hire non-union workers to replace their striking employees.

"The Unions representing Kellogg employees in these plants are on strike, and we are looking for employees to permanently replace them, joining hundreds of Kellogg salaried employees, hourly employees, and contractors to keep the lines running."

The post then explained how to fill out the applications in an effort to clog Kellogg's system.

"It’s time to clog their toilet of an application pipeline."
"Using the job posting links above, submit an application for one or more sites."
"When you apply, pretend you’re a resident of one of the cities with a Kellogg strike (Omaha, Battle Creek, Lancaster or Memphis) and make up an address and phone number using the zip codes and area codes listed below."
"This way they can’t filter out our apps easily."

The comments section of the Reddit post was filled with plenty of eager participants.

"Thank you for the info! This feels like I’m doing more than just boycotting."- Chojyugiga

"I live near one of these. I've applied with full intentions of showing up and wasting their time"- Speshialk

"Hells yeah! submitted an application just now!"- coconaut_prime

"Just sent in another one lol feels good man."- PowerfulProle

"Applied, my cv is a picture of a bactrian camel. Hope they appreciate it."- R0naldUlyssesSwanson

Twitter users also came forward to join the crusade or to applaud those taking a stand against the cereal giant.





Perhaps a lack of legitimate applications to fill the 1,400 openings will result in Kellogg's returning to the negotiating table with the union.

Local union vice president, Kevin Bradshaw expressed his belief filling those numerous spots would be a difficult task indeed to reporters outside the Memphis factory this past Tuesday.

"I mean, they can't hire enough people in one plant, let alone 1,400."

Bradshaw also stood firm in his commitment to the strike, remaining optimistic for a better outcome for Kellogg's workforce.

"The message we're trying to send and the message that we are saying is that we will last one day longer than them and one day stronger than them."