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Eric Trump's Tweet Hinting That 'People Know' What's Really Happening Backfires Perfectly In His Face

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Another day, another epic Trump family self-own.

The President's son Eric Trump found himself on the business end of an epic Twitter dragging after a tweet he posted implying a conspiracy was at work to dethrone his father blew up in his face.

The tweet, posted yesterday, quoted well-known alt-right conspiracy theorist Mike Cernovich.

Cernovich is a well-known alt-right provocateur who has been instrumental in amplifying debunked conspiracy theories like QAnon and Pizzagate.

Eric Trump's tweet is just the latest attempt by figures in the Trump circle to sow doubt by claiming the election is fraudulent.

President Trump and his associates have repeatedly claimed, both before and after Election Day, that the ballots themselves are fraudulent. There has been no evidence of any kind to support this.

They have also filed lawsuits claiming that Republican election count observers have been barred from entering the counting facilities in key battleground states, despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, including live webcams broadcasting the counting procedure in which Trump associates like Pam Bondi can be seen overseeing the counts.

Some of the lawsuits have been immediately thrown out of court. Even many of Trump's fellow Republicans, like his close confidante Chris Christie, have spoken out in the media about the lawsuits' lack of merit, pointing out the lack of evidence for the complaints being made.

It was this lack of evidence for any wrongdoing that people on Twitter tapped into in responding to Eric Trump's tweet. His suggestion that the American people "know what is going on" is correct, after all: "what is going on" is an election his father lost.

And they let him know in no uncertain terms with a tidal wave of clapbacks.










As of this writing, Joe Biden maintains an electoral lead in all remaining states with outstanding votes to be counted, with the exception of North Carolina and Alaska. If those leads hold, the President has no path to the 270 electoral votes required for a win.