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Yogi Deletes Tweet Saying She Doesn't Want To Share 'Healing Space' With Vaxxed People After Backlash

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A yoga influencer got slammed on Twitter for a controversial take.

Philadelphia yogi Godis Oyá recently deleted a tweet she posted that caused some major backlash.

Oyá, who boasts over 44,000 followers, practices Kundalini yoga and consistently posts about spirituality, wellness, and health.

It's not all sunshine and rainbows, however, as the yogi also often posts misinformation about vaccines. Namely, the vaccine to protect against the worst of the Coronavirus (COVID-19).

The COVID-19 vaccine has been the subject of much controversy due to the sheer amount of ignorance and conspiracy theories being thrown around.

Criticisms of vaccines can come in many forms, whether it be former U.S. President Donald Trump's die-hard fans, outlandish theorists who claim that vaccines contain "5G" or "microchips," and, unfortunately, much of the yoga and "wellness" community.

Oyá has frequently spread common misconceptions and conspiracy theories about the COVID-19 vaccines, such as the myth that vaccinated people "shed antibodies and can spread negative symptoms of the vaccine to others.

Recently, though, Oyá took her vaccine bias one step further, tweeting that the COVID-19 vaccination leaves people with a new, "negative energetic imprint."

She then went on to suggest that she would refuse to teach yoga to vaccinated people.

Her tweet reads:

"Highly re-considering sharing healing space with vax'ed clients. It's just a different energy and energetic imprint carried, in which eye (sic) do not wish to take on at this time. or ever."

This tweet sparked backlash for Oyá, as other Twitter users were quick to defend vaccine science and dragged Oyá for her ignorance.

Comments from the now deleted tweet included reactions such as:

"the black community is dying in droves and this girl talking bout energy lmfao"
"y'all are not spiritual or healers y'all are unemployed and stupid."

Oyá has since deleted the tweet, yet that hasn't stopped the Twitter community from calling her out.









Unfortunately, Oyá's assertion that vaccines can negatively affect a person's "energy" isn't an uncommon belief in the wellness community.

Many of her followers agreed with her opinion of vaccinated people, claiming that vaccines make people "angrier."

One commenter even went as far as to ask:

"Do you also see how there's less light in their eyes?"

Unfortunately, it's safe to assume Oyá will continue spreading misinformation about vaccines, but hopefully she learned her lesson this time.