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Kristen Stewart Eloquently Shuts Down Haters Who Say There Shouldn't Be LGBTQ+ Superheroes

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In an interview with Variety, Kristen Stewart had a response for conservatives upset LGBTQ+ people are finally being represented as superheros—albeit in small numbers compared to Marvel's and DC's extensive body of work.

In an upcoming movie, Eternals, Haaz Sleiman will be playing husband to openly gay superhero Phastos (Bryan Tyree).

Sleiman told Out how it feels to be playing this role.

"I feel lucky, and I'm grateful."
"And…I don't want to sound arrogant, but I feel like Marvel, they were very smart to cast me in it because I got to humanize the hell out of it."
"I got to humanize an LGBTQ+ family and show how beautiful they are."

When Variety's Clayton Davis asked what Stewart says to anyone who "says this is not how superheroes are supposed to be portrayed," Stewart knew exactly what to say.

She said:

"I would say that you've had your time."
"If you're happier and more comfortable looking in the rearview mirror, that is where we will leave you, bruh."
"But sure, go watch every other movie that feels like it hasn't really touched on what we are, and we will just continue growing without you."



Marvel and DC continue to give the LGBTQ+ community the representation they've been searching for through comics, movies and television.

Marvel announced a new openly gay comic superhero after the likeness of Captain America named Aaron Fischer.

Bisexual representation was confirmed in a recent Robin comic, Superman and Kitty Pryde from X-Men. Many also believe Marvel confirmed The Winter Soldier as bisexual. Fans are also convinced Loki is genderfluid based on a trailer that came out before the airing of the new series.

Stewart's comments in support of realistic representation were well received.








Of course, not everyone is as excited about Queer superheroes.

Fox News contributor Raymond Arroyo complained about the new comic books and claimed they are "sexualizing" superheroes despite decades of heterosexual love interests in nearly every comic series.

Arroyo said:

"Call me when they have a gender-stable aisle with superheroes whose sexualities we know nothing about"
"Why are they sexualizing superheroes?"

Former Superman actor Dean Cain also accused writers of "bandwagoning" instead of actually being bold, but he's not angry at the representation like most conservatives.

Cain said:

"I don't think it's bold or brave or some crazy new direction."
"If they had done this 20 years ago, perhaps that would be bold or brave."
"Brave would be having him fight for the rights of gay people in Iran where they'll throw you off a building for the offence of being gay."
"Why don't they have him fight the injustices that created the refugees whose deportation he's protesting?"
"That would be brave, I'd read that."

Regardless of what fight the superheroes are putting up, it's clear representation that reflects the diversity of the real world is the start of something necessary.