Most Read

News

Twitter Is Naming All The Things That Are Apparently Harder To Get Into Than The US Capitol

SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images; @BROWNSGA/Twitter

Wednesday's siege of the U.S. Capitol by violent Donald Trump supporters who were emboldened by his false claims of a stolen election held captive a global audience who were dumbfounded by the insurrection unfolding in real-time.

A significant number of the MAGA mob managed to get past the barriers to the Capitol, smashed numerous windows and made their way to the atrium, rotunda and eventually the chambers of Congress waving Confederate, neo-Nazi and White supremacist flags.

The chaos led to the death of a female rioter, who was fatally shot while trying to breach the chambers of Congress along with three others who suffered "medical emergencies" and later died of their injuries and a Capitol police officer who was beaten by the rioters.

People were astonished at the lack of law enforcement on hand—compared to the troops called out for Black Lives Matter events—and nonexistent attempts at deescalating the horrific situation or keep rioters off Capitol grounds.

But what was most perplexing was the ease in which the rioters managed to breach the U.S. Capitol in the first place.

Many people compared the invasion of the Capitol to other locations harder to get into when Twitter user Rachie (@itsmeRachie) asked:

"Name a place with tighter security than the Capitol. RIGHT answers only."

The responses were hilarious and plentiful.










Everyday objects were also added to the list of things people thought were harder to get into.










Reporter Trevor Hughes—who covered many major protests and riots—told USA Today police response to the violence was "mild."

Said Hughes:

"I remember last summer watching as federal officers chased Black Lives Matter protesters through the streets of Portland, firing pepper balls at them for refusing to leave the area around the federal courthouse."
"I can still hear the explosions of the tear gas canisters, over and over and over, dispersing crowds in which only a few people were actually throwing bottles or bags of flaming garbage."
"In comparison, the law enforcement response at the Capitol yesterday came across as deliberately low key."