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Clip Of Rush Limbaugh Accusing Michael J. Fox Of 'Exaggerating' His Parkinson's Resurfaces After His Death

NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP via Getty Images/Roy Rochlin/WireImage

Many of Rush Limbaugh's more unsavory statements on air are beginning to resurface after his death. While many found him generally insufferable, some are surprised by the things the man was willing to say on the air.

One of these incidents that surprised and horrified many a Twitter user was Limbaugh's suggestion that actor Michael J. Fox, who is also known as a very vocal advocate for Parkinson's research, was "exaggerating" his Parkinson's symptoms.

Limbaugh was criticizing the ad below, which Fox recorded in support of former Senator Claire McCaskill, who supported research into stem cell treatment for the nervous system disorder.

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Limbaugh accused Fox of exaggerating his symptoms for dramatic effect.

"In this commercial, he is exaggerating the effects of the disease. He is moving all around and shaking and it's purely an act. This is the only time I've ever seen Michael J. Fox portray any of the symptoms of the disease he has."

Brian Tyler Cohen, best known for his eponymous YouTube political commentary show, shared a clip of the segment from Limbaugh's show on Twitter. The reactions largely consisted of shock and disgust, and several remarked on the similarity between Limbaugh's remarks and former President Trump's mocking of disabled reporter Serge KovaleskiSerge Kovaleski in 2015.

Twitter users didn't pull any punches in their criticism of Limbaugh's ableist rhetoric.







The sarcasm was downright palpable.



While Limbaugh retracted his comments within hours of making them because of the sheer level of backlash he faced at the time, this is far from the only example of the man mocking people for things outside of their control. He also famously mocked a 13-year-old Chelsea Clinton, referring to the teen as "the White House Dog."

His 30 inflammatory years on the air gave rise to plenty of reasons for many people to be indifferent, at best, to his passing.