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Kentucky Republican Representative Thomas Massie was harshly criticized after he tweeted a family photo in which he and six family members each brandished a military-style weapon in front of a Christmas tree.

Massie's tweet came just days after a mass shooting occurred at Oxford High School in Oxford Township, Michigan.

In it, Massie asked for Santa Claus to "please bring ammo."

Last week, James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of school shooter Ethan Crumbley, were arrested following an intense manhunt and charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter.

The Crumbleys had purchased the handgun used in the shooting as a Christmas gift for their son on Black Friday and stored it improperly.

The Crumbleys were called to the school shortly before the shooting occurred to discuss a violent drawing made by their son and did not inform the school they had recently purchased a gun for their son.

Speaking at a news conference on Friday, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said that the charges "are intended to hold the individuals who contributed to this tragedy accountable and also send a message that gun owners have a responsibility."

The shooting has once again sparked a national debate on gun control and the merits of the Second Amendment. The school district, Oxford Community Schools, has confirmed it will conduct an investigation of the incident.

Tim Throne, the district superintendent, confirmed to The New York Times that "the district also plans to ask an independent security consultant to review the district’s safety practices and procedures."

Massie's photograph was harshly condemned as a questionable display of judgment and reignited calls for gun control nationwide.









Massie has proven one of the more controversial members of the House of Representatives, previously making headlines for pushing against COVID-19 restrictions.

Over the summer, Massie shared a meme showing an arm tattooed with a concentration camp identification number, effectively comparing vaccine mandates to the Holocaust, which was the systematic murder of more than six million Jews across German-occupied Europe.